News & Insight

 

Stuart William Kelly

15 January 1998 – 25th July 2016 (18 years)

 

2015 Thomas Kelly Youth Foundation Dinner, Stuart at 17 years, presented a raw and moving speech on the impact of violence and how life changes forever.

Stuart William Kelly 15th January 1998 to 25th July 2016.   Stuart we love you.

 
 

Stuarts' Story

From a very young age it became apparent that Stuart was quite different to the norm.  His sense of humour was infectious, cheeky, witty and very funny.  Stuart had this uncanny ability to change the mood in a room almost immediately, not only as a youngster but also later in life with his classmates and adults.  Stuart graduated from The King’s School (North Parramatta) in October 2015, after completing his Higher School Certificate.  He was a school prefect as well as house captain of Broughton Forrest, one of the larger boarding houses.  Stuart had many abbreviations to his name throughout his life, all endearing to the person who he was; Stu, Stuwie and SKay.

Stuart is also the younger brother of Thomas Kelly (18) who was murdered by a cowards attack in 2012.  Stuart was only 14 years old when he lost his older brother – a terrible travesty.  Stuart showed extraordinary strength, courage and hope, far above his young age.  He stood up bravely for what he believed in and never once faltered.  His tenacity constantly amazed us through his determination to make a difference to his world, to leave it in a better way than he had found it.

Sitting with him one afternoon on the verandah of our family home, I asked Stuart what he aspired to achieve as house captain of Broughton Forrest.  Stuart thought for a while then replied that he wanted to ensure it would be a safe place for all of boys from Year 8 to Year 12, a home where each boy would “fit in” and be respected for his individuality. I queried if this was possible, Stuart replied that he “would give it a good go”.

On Stuart’s final day at Kings, driving out of the school gates for the last time as a student, with the car packed full of his clothes and knick-knacks, was a sad time in many ways, but also a time for reflection of the many good times.  I asked Stu if he remembered our conversation from a year ago, about what he had wanted to leave as a legacy to his house and school, and if he felt he had achieved that aspiration.  As Stuart was peering out through the car window at the school he had called “home” for the last 6 years, he turned to me and said: “Yes, Dad – I think we did achieve it.  I’m proud of our year group and what we stood for”. 

Stu had many loves in his life.  Probably first and foremost was his love for his Parramatta Eels.  Each new season brought new hope AND the same words that we had all heard year after year – “It’s our time this year, wait and see!! – We’ve signed up this amazing player who is one of the best, if not THE best in the whole competition”.

Stuart, a wonderful son and brother, a true friend and an incredible young man.  You are so missed by all.  The outpouring of memories from Stuart’s friends captures his spirit and the essence of Stu.

 
 

 
 

Dear Ralph and Kathy,

I cannot tell you how much my heart has been breaking for you over these last few days.  I just don't have the words to say, so I will borrow from others.

Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bessie Stanley suggested that a successful life was:

To laugh often and much;
To win the respect of intelligent people
and the affection of children;
To earn the appreciation of honest critics
and endure the betrayal of false friends;
To appreciate beauty, to find the best in others;
To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child,
a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;
To know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived.
This is to have succeeded.

Stuart succeeded.  Stuart has left the world a better place. He fronted camera's even when his natural disposition was not to. He endured the challenge and even betrayal of those who did not support his mission of making Australia a safer place.

As coach of the Under 14 Cs at King's, he won the affection of children, and among his mentors on staff, he also won the respect of intelligent people.

Stuart appreciated beauty and he would find the best in others. He had many wonderful mates.

Your son has left the world in a healthier condition because of his support for measures to limit problem drinking. This has been transformative work. Vital. Dangerous. Visionary.
In every sense, Stuart succeeded, and you can be proud of him.

Be assured of my thoughts and prayers.
With deep affection,
Tim
Dr T F Hawkes OAM
Headmaster The Kings School

Memories from friends....
“Stuart you had more of an effect on all of our lives than you ever could have known.  The lack of your presence will change our lives forever, you were an amazing friend and your phenomenal attitude to life will change our perception of difficult circumstances for the rest of our lives.  You are the reason to live life to all it can be and you are the reason we do everything possible to make it worth living.” Archie.
“Stuart, we will greatly miss you.  God bless your beautiful soul and rest in peace with your big brother, Tom”.
“You are the best room mate I could have asked for and an even better friend.  You could walk into a room and make everyone laugh and smile.” Sam.
“To live in the hearts of others is never to die.  Forever in our hearts Stu.  Love and miss you mate.” Murdoch.
“He was a god amongst men.” Kieran.
“We loved you like a brother Stuart, unconditionally.  You and Tom will always be brothers to us and will live on forever in our hearts.  Rest easy mate we love you”. Jack, Henry and Tom.
“Goodbyes are not forever, nor the end; it simply means I will miss you until we meet again.  May you rest in peace with your beautiful brother.  This world has once again suffered a great loss.” Georgina.
“The passed days I just couldn't believe it, even now I am still in denial about one of my best mates being gone forever.  It's so hard to comprehend... I would have bent over backwards for the bloke, as I am sure all of the people that knew him would have done.  He was definitely one of the funniest people I have ever met.  I will miss him dearly”. James.
"All your workmates at North Shore Private Hospital miss you terribly Stuart, it isn't the same without you, but we've set aside the shelf where you used to take a sneaky nap (after all your work was done of course) and we've named it in your honour :) - you’ll be in our thoughts and prayers champion.  To Stuart's family, your son was a young man of wonderful qualities, a hard worker, good humoured, humble and kind.  If more young people were like him the world would be a better place.” Justin.

 

 
 

We would like to share with you a poem Stuart read at the 2015 Foundation Dinner.  It constantly touches our hearts.  We can confidently say that Stuart could look in the mirror and be proud of his standing and who he was in this world.  

“Man in the Glass”

When you get all you want and your struggle for self,

and the world makes you king for a day,

then go to the mirror and look at yourself

and see what that man has to say.

For it isn't your mother, your father or wife

whose judgment upon you must pass,

but the man, whose verdict counts most in your life

is the one staring back from the glass.

He's the fellow to please,

never mind all the rest.

For he's with you right to the end,

and you've passed your most difficult test

if the man in the glass is your friend.

You may be like Jack Horner and "chisel" a plum,

And think you're a wonderful guy,

But the man in the glass says you're only a bum

If you can't look him straight in the eye.

You can fool the whole world,

down the highway of years,

and take pats on the back as you pass.

But your final reward will be heartache and tears

if you've cheated the man in the glass.

 

Stuart, I love you.  We love you Ralph, Kathy and Madeleine.